Institute for Corean-American Studies

Chang Gyu Hahn
Assistant Professor in Psychiatry
University of Pennsylvania

Chang-Gyu Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. is currently Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia PA. Chang Gyu obtained his medical degree from the Medical College of the Seoul National University in Korea and then pursued his research interest as a graduate student in the laboratory of Jonathan Covault, M.D., Ph.D. in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology at the University of Connecticut. His thesis work for Ph.D. was focused on gene regulations of neural cell adhesion molecules associated with changes in extra-cellular signals during the development as well cellular stimulation. Chang Gyu's recent research interest has focused on investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the pathobiology of bipolar disorder as well as schizophrenia. He and his colleagues have developed the olfactory epithelial biopsy as a system to study molecular and cellular pathology in neuronal cells of patients with psychiatric illnesses. The methodology is widely seen as a unique approach to examine neurobiological substrates of psychiatric illnesses. Chang Gyu's research has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD), the Theodore and Vada Stanely Research Foundation and a number of pharmaceutical companies.

Chang Gyu sees himself as an eclectically oriented student of human psychology and has a great interest in psychodynamic understanding of human behavior. He currently practices psychotherapy utilizing principles of various schools, such as psychoanalytic, analytical psychological (Jungian) and others. Chang Gyu was born and raised in a Buddhistic family and used to be a Zen Buddhist. He became a Christian while he was in Connecticut and has served a Korean Presbyterian church in Philadelphia.

ICAS Web Site Links for Chang Gyu Hahn:

Pilgrimage or Self-preservation: Korean Churches in the U.S. as Transitional Objects
Summer 2003 Symposium
Bulletin of June 16, 2003

This page last updated 1/14/2004 jdb

ICAS Fellow
Speakers &