ICAS Polling


May 30, 2019

SURVEY SHOWS
SECURITY OF SOUTH KOREA PREREQUISITE FOR SECURITY OF THE KOREAN PENINSULA
SOUTH KOREA AND THE US TOGETHER SHOULD SUSTAIN SOUTH KOREA'S SECURITY
A COUNTRY MUST EITHER BUILD THE CAPABILITY TO DEFEND ITSELF WHEN THREATENED
OR PAY A POLITICAL PRICE FOR NOT DOING SO
PEACE REGIME IN THE KOREAN PENINSULA POSSIBLE IN THE ABSENCE OF NUKES AND GULAGS
PIECE BY PIECE DEAL APPROACH WILL FAIL THE GOAL OF DENUCLEARISING NORTH KOREA
THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION MAY NOT BE ABLE TO TAME THE KIM REGIME
RELIEF ON SANCTIONS ON NORTH KOREA WON'T HELP DENUCLEARISATION
HUMANITARIAN FOOD AID MAY BE ALLOWED TO NORTH KOREA
NORTH KOREA MAY SUCCEED IN TESTING NUCLEAR SLBM

Washington, D.C. May 30, 2019 (ICAS) A third new poll conducted by the Institute for Corean-American Studies (ICAS) continues to identify how the current state of U.S.-Korea relationships and some of the Korean Peninsula issues are viewed.

Conducted to an ICAS audience on the Hill, the poll shows that more than 90% of the respondents in the survey do not believe that security in the Korean Peninsula is possible in the absense of security of South Korea (SK), and more than 80% believe that the US and SK should together defend and sustain SK's security. Interestingly, 31% believe that SK and Japan should defend SK's security and 24% believe that SK should team up with North Korea (NK) to defend its security. No respondents believe NK alone should defend and sustain SK's security. China (14%) and Russia (10%) are believed to be able to work with SK for its security.

84% of the respondents believe that a country must either build its capability to defend itself when threatened or pay a political price for not doing so.

From the perspectives of the respondents, NK's nukes and its human rights issues continue to pose challenges to achieving peace in the Korean Peninsula. 65% disagrees that "peace regime" in the Korean Peninsula is possible in the presence of NK's nukes and missiles and 74% disagrees that such peace regime is possible in the presence of NK's Gulag. 80% believe that they would not be surprised if NK succeeds in nuclear SLBM (submarine launched ballistic missile) test.

The respondents remain critical of a "piece by piece deal" approach to denuclearising NK. 61% do not believe such an approach will achieve the goal of denuclearising NK. In the same vein, 67% do not seem confident in the Trump administration for its ability to tame the Kim regime.

Adopting and maintaining the sanctions on NK continues to be viewed as necessary among the respondents. 67% does not believe that a relief of the sanctions against NK by the UN and the US will help denuclearise NK. Similarly, 67% do not believe that some form of sanctions should be lifted to relieve apparent hardship reportedly being experienced by NK populace while 57% indicate that some form of food aid may be allowed to NK at this time on the humanitarian ground. The survey was conducted from May 11 to May 18, 2019 via email with a moderate credibility interval. Supplemental graphic data are available on www.icasinc.org/strategy.html and www.icasinc.org/strategy/polling3.pptx.

Polling III: Dunning-Krugger Effect

Inquiry to ICAS@icasinc.org

About Institute for Corean-American Studies (ICAS)

ICAS was established in 1973, as a non-profit, non-partisan, and private educational and research organization and it is incorporated in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. ICAS is not an agent of any government and/or a foreign principal, and is solely supported by voluntary contributions. Its activities and programs rely on the private donations of the general public, i.e., individuals, foundations, and corporations. ICAS promotes pertinent relations and conducts appropriate activities with a special emphasis on multilateral relations between the United States and Asia-Pacific rim nations. Its membership includes individuals from varied sectors embracing academic, corporate, cultural, educational, international and other related fields. ICAS strives to provide public services pro bono publico.

This page last modified May 30, 2019 jdb